Archives for the month of: July, 2014

Since I’ve reached the part of my internship where I need to evaluate a Ruby web API client library and had never written Ruby, I went looking for places to learn! Some of these are books, some are websites, some are web tutorials. All are online and free. If you’re new to Ruby, give these a shot!

Books:

Ruby Best Practices: http://cdn.oreillystatic.com/oreilly/booksamplers/7_Ruby_Best_Practices_Sampler.pdf
Previously available for free at http://blog.rubybestpractices.com/. The author is now working on Practicing Ruby: https://practicingruby.com/
Interesting links from Practicing Ruby: https://practicingruby.com/articles/meditations-on-bad-and-good-code-1 and https://practicingruby.com/articles/meditations-on-bad-and-good-code-2 .

Programming Ruby: The Pragmatic Programmer’s Guide: http://ruby-doc.com/docs/ProgrammingRuby/
When people talk about “pickaxe book” this is the one they’re talking about! This version is fairly dated:
“This book documents Version 1.6 of Ruby, which was released in September 2000.”

Why’s (Poignant) Guide To Ruby: http://mislav.uniqpath.com/poignant-guide/book/
If you want an off-the-wall introduction to Ruby, this one has cartoon foxes.

Mr. Neighborly’s Humble Little Ruby Book: http://www.humblelittlerubybook.com/

Learn Ruby The Hard Way: http://ruby.learncodethehardway.org/book/

Web-based tutorials:

Ruby Koans: http://rubykoans.com/
Make things work! Also downloadable.

Try Ruby: http://tryruby.org/
More in-browser Ruby tutorials.

Codeacademy’s Ruby module: http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/ruby
Interactive web-based Ruby lessons.

RubyWarrior: https://www.bloc.io/ruby-warrior/#/
Adorable game where you write Ruby code to move your warrior and defeat enemies.

Misc:
A MIT OpenCourseWare handout that has a no-frills guide to some basics and talks about differences between Ruby and Python: http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/6-170-software-studio-spring-2013/recitations/MIT6_170S13_rec3-Ruby.pdf

Ruby Style Guide: https://github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide . I’ve been told that this is as close as the Ruby community gets to consensus on what “good Ruby” looks like.

command line ruby cheat sheets: http://cheat.errtheblog.com/s/rvm

Ruby Cookbook is not freely available, but the all the code from the book is: http://www.crummy.com/writing/RubyCookbook/

Ruby is definitely not what I am used to, but it seems like an interesting language and I’m looking forward to learning more of it when I have more time.

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When I decided to start working in tech, I knew that someday I’d find my place in the informal women-in-tech backchannel warning system.

It seems that I’ve already reached a place where I can practice two kinds of post-conference networking: the standard mild awkwardness of “Hello! Remember those interests we share? I think you are a professionally interesting person!” but also “Hey, heads up–I’ve been made aware that a person you socialized with has a history of sexually assaulting incapacitated women, and thought you might want to know.”

I knew I’d get here sooner or later.

I wish I’d been able to finish my first internship before I did.

I was honored to give the final keynote at last week’s Open Source Bridge 2014. My talk was titled “‘Why are these people following me?’: Leadership for the introverted, uncertain, and astonished”. It is the story of how I learned and claimed my leadership skills–because leading and conveying authenticity are both learnable skills.

This talk contains brief and nonspecific mentions of emotional abuse and thoughts of suicide. The video skips in several places; I’ve filled in the transcript to the best of my memory, but if you happen to have more complete notes or corrections send them my way!

Video and transcript are below the fold. This talk is licensed CC-BY-SA.

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